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NO-VAX VS YES-VAX

In recent weeks, I’ve come across these graphics on LinkedIn created as part of the discussion on vaccines against the Coronavirus:

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They made me reflect on risk and crisis communication, on the effectiveness of certain communicative choices that are undoubtedly impactful, even graphically beautiful, but the question is:

Do they work?

I have my doubts.

How many times have we heard smokers who are afraid of flying being told that the risk of getting cancer is much more likely than having a plane crash? The perplexed face of the smoker immediately comes to mind; we will hardly convince them to quit smoking and board the plane calmly. Why?

Different brains

The point is that the perceptions of these two risks reside in two different areas of the brain, referring to two different atavistic fears, not showing the dangers on the same level. I’m sure a convinced NO VAX will continue not only to eat not-so-healthy hamburgers but also to offer them to their loved ones, children, grandchildren, and closest people. They will continue to smoke and have dinners based on hot dogs and carbonated drinks with the proverbial secret recipe, and they will continue not to get vaccinated because they are terrified of the contents of the antidote, the dominance of pharmaceutical companies, and the ill intentions of governors with hidden agendas who can’t wait to inoculate who knows what to the population.

Hugs in cellophane

The same doubt comes to me in front of the television, watching Tornatore’s commercial about hugs. Cinematically stunning, like all the Maestro’s productions, but what anguish!

A claustrophobic setting, feelings of the beyond, death, and insecurity. Raise your hand if you feel uplifted by this message.

Rather, it seems like being catapulted onto the set of Casper and one expects any moment to see some ghosts swirling in the air.

Here too the question arises: will it work?

I rush to get vaccinated, but where?

And even if I have been convinced by the graphics, I am fascinated by the video and want to get vaccinated immediately. I’m running! But where?

And even if I knew where, would they have the vaccine?

The scandal of the vaccinated “off-list” tells us that tens of thousands have found the answer, a solution hidden from many others, even those entitled, or people who would feel more comfortable doing it but have not been called.

I think of supermarket cashiers, bank operators, and couriers who have ensured essential services for us in recent months, and now wouldn’t be prioritizing their vaccination equally essential?